Greenpeace protest against the ship SBI Subaru filled with 60,000 tons of US hardcoal headed from Texas to Hamburg. Just a few hours before Trump informs the world what role the US will play in the Paris agreement there were dinghys on the river Elbe, swimmers in the water with banners reading "resist" ,"no coal" and "no Trump" and the same writing on the vessle’s side, sending a clear message to the fossil fuels industry. Climbers boarded the ship with banners:"planet earth first". Wenige Stunden vor der Entscheidung von US-Praesident Donald Trump zum UN-Klimaabkommen demonstrieren Greenpeace-Aktivisten im Hamburger Hafen fuer konsequenten Klimaschutz. Die Aktivisten folgen in Schlauchbooten einem Frachtschiff, das etwa 60.000 Tonnen US-Steinkohle von Texas nach Deutschland transportiert. An die Bordwand der SBI Subaru pinseln sie in zwei Meter großen Lettern „No Trump – No Coal“. Schwimmer in der Elbe und Enterer an Bord halten Banner "Planet Earth First".

This is exactly how terrible Trump’s climate change decision is

President Donald Trump’s decision to pull the US out of the Paris climate accords has tangible costs for the entire world.

Here are five ramifications we can expect to see.

Originally published on Mamamia

1. The US could become the highest emitting country in the world

America is currently the second largest contributor globally of greenhouse gases behind China. With China now reaffirming their commitment to the Paris accords and taking steps to reduce high-emitting fuel sources like coal it is possible they could become the highest emitting country.

2. BUT, local and state governments can take action to curtail this

In much the same way that we have levels of government that can commit to environmental initiatives regardless of federal initiatives so too do the United States. In an amusing development the mayor of Pittsburg responded to Donald Trump’s statement that he was “elected by the people of Pittsburg and not the people of Paris” by declaring that he would ensure his city followed the guidelines of the Paris accords.

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3. Locally slowing down action to reduce emissions will make bleaching events on the Great Barrier Reef more likely

Australia’s foremost expert on coral, Terry Hughes, who has conducted exhaustive surveys of the Great Barrier Reef says immediate action on climate change is needed to help protect the Reef.

He told media: “Climate change is not a future threat. On the Great Barrier Reef, it’s been happening for 18 years.”

The Reef is experiencing its second major bleaching event in 2 years. In March 2017, Greenpeace Australia Pacific is bearing witness to this tragedy and calling on Governments everywhere to take action against coal.

In March 2017, Greenpeace Australia Pacific bore witness to the second mass bleaching event on the Great Barrier Reef in two years.

4. More global warming = more heatwaves and more intense bushfires, in an already hot and bushfire affected continent

And not just that. As climate change becomes more severe extreme weather events increase in frequency and intensity. The disturbing thing is that fires release carbon into the atmosphere, which in turn drives climate change.

5. In the Pacific, communities already affected by sea level rise will bear a greater cost

In the Pacific Islands people are already living with the real-world consequences of climate change like rising sea levels. In the Solomons five entire islands have already disappeared.

6. This in turn will change the way the world works

In the world political arena, there are likely to be repercussions in trade and other treaty relationships for the US. The EU and China have reaffirmed their commitment to climate change. If the Pacific Islands feel like America have turned their back on them while China have not this could impact on their relationship with everything from food security through fishing to the placement of military forces throughout the Pacific.