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Results: ‘Climate Change & Energy’ Category Archive

Carmichael coal mine’s impacts will be felt for generations

Posted on July 29, 2014 at 10:50 by Ben Pearson

Originally posted on the ABC – 28 Jul 2014 TEN MONTHS AGO I described pending decisions about coal developments on the Great Barrier Reef left by the outgoing Labor government as “a dead cat in Greg Hunt’s in-tray”. I’ve met Greg Hunt a few times over the years and I reckon he’s a decent bloke Continue reading →

Jono Moylan, ANZ and the great fossil fuel swindle

Posted on July 28, 2014 at 12:09 by Nic Clyde

When Jono Moylan was told last Friday that he would not be going to jail, but would instead be getting a two year good behaviour bond, I breathed a huge sigh of relief, along with most other Australians I’m sure. But it also reminded me of a night that occurred about 6 weeks ago, on Continue reading →

Australia made history, but for all the wrong reasons

Posted on July 18, 2014 at 11:59 by Nic Clyde

A few short years ago, putting a price on carbon was a sensible first step on the journey to tackle the main cause of climate change – our carbon emissions from increasing use of fossil fuels.

How tiny plastic people protested around the world

Posted on July 03, 2014 at 16:30 by Greenpeace Australia Pacific

The news of LEGO’s cosy relationship with Shell has led to tiny protests erupting around the country – nay, the world. Famous national and international landmarks have been festooned with banners as the streets resounded the stamp of little plastic feet. In Sydney, a protest took place in front of the iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge Continue reading →

Getting to know Colin Russell of the Arctic 30

Posted on July 03, 2014 at 10:00 by Alex Harris

Nine months after being illegally seized at gunpoint Gazprom’s Prirazlomnaya Arctic oil platform in the Pechora sea – our Arctic Sunrise has been released. Colin Russell, one of the Greenpeace activists on board the ship when it was boarded last September, has been working with our ships for the past 15 years. We asked him Continue reading →

It’s time for LEGO to block Shell

Posted on July 02, 2014 at 09:00 by Greenpeace Australia Pacific

Imagine you’re eight years old and picture the Arctic. There are no oil rigs, no industrial shipping and no politicians fighting over it.

An Inconvenient Strewth? 4 things you should know about the Palmer-Gore climate speech

Posted on June 26, 2014 at 14:46 by Jessica Panegyres

Watching last night’s press conference with Clive Palmer and Al Gore on climate change was one of the more bizarre moments I’ve witnessed in Australian politics. Image: twitter.com/SBSNews We won’t know exactly what Clive’s announcements mean for a little while yet. Based on past experience, what he said last night might not be his view tomorrow – Continue reading →

Dawn of the Dead: Whitehaven Coal, the zombie mining company

Posted on June 25, 2014 at 15:46 by Julie Macken

Whitehaven Coal Company is kinda like a zombie extra from Dawn of the Dead. Every time we think it’s finally gone, it staggers to its feet – minus an arm – and comes lurching back into frame. On the 12th of June, when the Land & Environment Court was just about to hand down its decision on whether Continue reading →

10 things Australia’s big energy companies don’t want you to know

Posted on June 24, 2014 at 13:32 by Rashini Suriyaarachchi

They might try to tell you they’re fighting for our clean energy future – but Origin Energy, EnergyAustralia and AGL are not as green as you think. Here are 10 things they’re trying to hide from you.

Do energy company executives really hate solar panels this much?

Posted on June 23, 2014 at 16:40 by Tom Ganderton

This wasn’t what people on Sydney’s George Street were expecting to see on their morning commute. Three men, dressed as the CEOs of Origin Energy, AGL Energy, and EnergyAustralia, were surrounded by a crowd and TV cameras as they hauled a dozen solar panels into a dumpster while spectators booed them on. Seriously! Activists bring Continue reading →

Don’t be a fossil fool: join the solar energy revolution!

Posted on June 11, 2014 at 11:49 by Rashini Suriyaarachchi

Low emissions, low water consumption, no waste, 100% renewable and increasingly affordable… Interested? Here’s what you need to know to go solar.

Our Arctic Sunrise is coming home

Posted on June 10, 2014 at 13:40 by Greenpeace Australia Pacific

Last week, we had a remarkable phone call from Murmansk. It was from the team of lawyers representing Greenpeace International telling us that the Russian Investigative Committee (IC) had decided to release the Arctic Sunrise, after nearly nine months of illegal detention in this remote Arctic port.

How to halt a bulldozer army while overcoming a fear of heights

Posted on June 10, 2014 at 11:47 by James Lorenz

This might seem like an unlikely thing for someone with vertigo to sign up for.  But, on Monday night, I volunteered to spend a night high in the canopy of critically-endangered Box Gums in the Leard Forest. It was a unique spot to witness the majesty of this place. I was suspended nine metres above Continue reading →

Sydney rallies parliamentarians to save Leard Forest from Whitehaven Coal’s bulldozers

Posted on June 04, 2014 at 15:46 by Tom Ganderton

It was an inspiring, empowering example of what our movement stands for. Today, hundreds of Sydney-siders joined a snap rally outside of the offices of NSW Planning Minister Pru Goward and NSW Environment Minister Rob Stokes asking them to immediately halt bulldozers tearing down Leard Forest. We were there to deliver a 30,000-strong emergency petition Continue reading →

The gentle caress of the bulldozer

Posted on May 30, 2014 at 16:55 by Julie Macken

Right now, a handful of brave folk are doing all they can to stop Whitehaven Coal from razing the ancient Leard State Forest in order to build a coal mine – currently the largest under construction in Australia.

Hockey exposes us as fair weather friends

Posted on May 15, 2014 at 17:45 by David Ritter

With this Budget, Joe Hockey has signaled to the rest of the planet that Australia expects to free ride on the efforts of others. He has abandoned the core Australian value of being true blue, writes David Ritter. Originally published in The Drum. “Hey True Blue, don’t say you’ve gone…” As Australians, we like to Continue reading →

Great Barrier Reef ‘facts’ TV ads ignore dredge dumping risks

Posted on May 05, 2014 at 12:12 by Greenpeace Australia Pacific

By Jon Brodie, James Cook University The United Nations is concerned about port expansions and dredging disposal in the Great Barrier Reef – but that bigger picture is ignored in new ‘Reef Facts’ commercials. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team, CC BY New “Reef Facts” commercials are currently airing during prime-time television shows in Australia, purporting to tell Continue reading →

Taking action, in freedom

Posted on May 02, 2014 at 11:04 by Greenpeace Australia Pacific

Protest against Russian oil tanker transporting oil from the Gazprom drilling platform © Prirazlomnaya Neugebauer/Greenpeace Today is the day. The very first barrels of Arctic oil have found their way to my home country. Gazprom, Russia’s biggest energy company, has shipped the first tanker with crude oil from the Arctic to the Rotterdam harbor, the Netherlands.

5 ways you might be wasting water

Posted on April 28, 2014 at 11:39 by Rashini Suriyaarachchi

You’re way past leaving the tap on while you brush your teeth – but here are 5 bad water habits you might still need to kick. If you’re Australian, you’re probably already a bit of a water conservation whiz. There was a time when watering your lawn in the middle of the day was a Continue reading →

#AustraliansForCoal is the latest sign of an industry in values freefall

Posted on April 15, 2014 at 17:12 by David Ritter

 ‘The problem for coal is that it is the single greatest driver of climate change’. Photograph: Tim Wimborne/Reuters Originally published in The Guardian During the second world war, my dad performed his war service down the coal mines in the UK. The work cost him his sense of smell, but gave him a profound sense Continue reading →