Greenpeace Australia Pacific BLOG

5 indoor plants that are natural purifiers

Posted on July 20, 2014 by Rashini Suriyaarachchi

dasiy

Think your office could do with some fresh air? Try working on a space station. When NASA wanted to help its astronauts breathe easier, they used plants that improve air quality. Take a look at these 5 plants that could help eliminate nasty toxins in the air.

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lily

Peace Lily

This beautiful, low maintenance flowering plant reduces toxin levels in the air. The Peace Lily topped NASA’s list for removing formaldehyde, benzene and trichloroethylene from the air.

paradise-palm_web

Bamboo Palm

According to the Huffington Post, this plant is great at clearing out benzene and trichloroethylene. A high transpiration rate means that Bamboo Palms pump moisture back into indoor atmospheres.

ivy"

English Ivy

According to NASA, this is the number one houseplant to grow indoors due to its incredible air filtering qualities. The Mother Nature Network says this plant may also reduce airborne fecal-matter particles!

snakeplant

Snake plant

This plant releases oxygen during the night rather than the day, and one in the bedroom may help you sleep better. Snake plants don’t need much light or water for survival, so they’re a perfect fit for any dim corners that need to be brought to life.

daisy

Gerbera Daisy

Extremely effective at removing chemical vapours in the air, this flowering plant can filter out trichloroethylene and benzene – making it perfect for a well-lit laundry or bedroom. What’s more – the Gerbera Daisy has long-lasting flowers that will bloom throughout winter!

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UPDATE: It’s also very important to note that some plants are incredibly toxic for housepets – including the English Ivy and Peace Lily mentioned above. The ASPCA has a very helpful list of plants that are toxic for cats, dogs and horses to help you make the best decision for your home or office.

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Blog post by: Rashini Suriyaarachchi
Rashini Suriyaarachchi is the Digital Assistant at Greenpeace Australia Pacific.
All blogposts by Rashini Suriyaarachchi
  • http://premiumpatio.com.au/ Emma Wilson

    Plants are the way of life I love to talk to them so often. I have decorated my outdoor area with plants and timber furniture. Timber outdoor furniture is one of the most aesthetic and easy to use furniture item that can be utilized both internally and outside of your home.

    Timber Outdoor Furniture Sydney

  • Glenn

    Do NOT get English Ivy or Peace Lily if you have a cat or dog though – they’re highly toxic

    • Rashini

      Very good point, Glenn! I’ve amended the post to reflect that. Thanks so much for your feedback :)

  • Ben

    A little bit irresponsible not to mention that some of these are deadly for pets.

    • Rashini

      Good point, Ben – have updated the post to reflect this now.

  • Catherine Scott

    We’ve go so many indoor plants we’ve been declared a nature reserve. Maybe no but dozens of pot bound buddies just teh same.

  • Jessica Haddock

    I have always had peace lillies and dogs and cats, they dont eat them as they are poisonous.

    • http://www.about.me/minxymoggy minxymoggy

      Same here, never had a problem despite having many cats and many peace lillies for many years. Most cats eat grass so the only other plants they tend to nibble on look like grass, which makes spider plants a problem, although it only gives them the runs.

  • Kelly Gartenzwerg

    Thats not a photo of a Gerbera daisy

  • disqus_wQP6vfFa15

    Spider plant any good?

    • Sylvia Lessells

      I always had a spider plant but the proper name for it to long .yes good indoor plants keep oxygen in the room/rooms even level without sapping it up like many others .

      • Sylvia Lessells

        Disqus Spider plant name is Chlorophytum comosum

    • Sylvia Lessells

      disqus Spider plant named Chlorophytum comosum

  • Bee Warren

    Good stuff! There are more. Spider plant is one though I can’t remember its specific qualities. Latin names might be helpful too to avoid confusion since common names are often colloquial and therefore a bit ambiguous

    • Sylvia Lessells

      Chlorophytum comosum is the name given for the spider plant Ben

  • Gervaise Soeurouge

    Greenpeace, please put the notice of dangers to pets from (recommended) toxic plants at the top or, even better, with the dangerous plant’s description. I knew about lilies and cats but not about ivy. This is important. You don’t want to kill our animal friends!!!

  • Gordon

    I guess there is not too many pets on a space station. Picking up the dog poo could be difficult.

  • Karla Di Lazzaro

    What a great read ! @disqus_AL3JMXSvKx:disqus

    • Rashini

      Thanks so much Karla – glad you enjoyed it!

  • Gordon38

    English Ivy, Hedera helix, native to central Europe, is a serious environmental weed in almost all states of Australia; it dominates under-storey vegetation and smothers trees and shrubs. As others have stated, it is also toxic to humans and many Australian mammals.
    Snake Plant, Sansevieria trifasciata, also known as mother-in-laws-tongue, is an environmental weed in Queensland.

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